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  #1  
Old 04-15-2010, 01:18 AM
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Torque

Do you guys torque your lug nuts on after market wheels? if so what do you typically tighten them too? i did not torque my 18s last summer but i want to do it right this season.
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  #2  
Old 04-15-2010, 04:08 AM
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100 ft. lbs.
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  #3  
Old 04-15-2010, 06:35 AM
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i did mine to 85
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Old 04-15-2010, 11:29 AM
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lol so which is it? is there a right or wrong answer? Does it depend on the stud diameter or the rim or the lugs??
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Old 04-15-2010, 11:35 AM
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I'd go with what your OM says. Rims will hold what that recommends. Any more than that and you'll start looking at breaking/stripping your lugs. Any less than that and you run the risk of lugs falling off. Just go with the OEM specs and you can't go wrong.
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  #6  
Old 04-15-2010, 12:20 PM
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Ok well I have heard 100 from a couple different people so I'll stick with that then. Does it mention in the manual the OM specifications?
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Old 04-15-2010, 02:23 PM
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I torque them with my arm :P lol I just do it until i feel it's a certain tightness, takes afew times going over them...but I don't have a torque wrench. Haven't run into any problems, 3 years in a row...
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Old 04-15-2010, 02:27 PM
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I think its 100. definately dont do it by hand. sure you can get it close but thats not good enough imo
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Old 04-15-2010, 02:42 PM
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I torque to oone hundred ft/lbs +/- 5 ft/lbs using my calibrated arm ;D The real trick is to use a torque wrench the first few times then start using a breaker bar or a wrench that is appx the same length as your torque wrench was. Start using your normal wrench every time, and check your work with the torque wrench, eventually you'll have the "feel" of how tight it should be. Another trick is to take a marker and draw a line across your lug and onto your rim. after you torque your lugs down the line will be offset. maybe a quarter turn, a half a turn or whatever, but if you can remember this you don't need to always have a torque wrench to maintain proper torque. You just know that once you got it tight you need to turn it appx 1/4 turn around and it'll be just about right. These are just little tricks I've picked up at my job,theres a lot of times we have to torque a nut down to a few hundred (or sometimes a few thousand ft/lbs) and it is just physically impossible to get a torque wrench in there. so we usually do the method with the line on all the nuts we can reach and get an average distance that equals the proper torque and when we get to the ones that are harder to access we draw a line and throw a slugging wrench on it and start pounding till it all lines up. It's a major pain in the ass, and a lot of times a major pain on the hand, but it works, it always passes breakaway torque, and is a method that our quality assurance guys will pass when they do their inspections. So I'm pretty sure it'll work for you too

I know that rant wasn't exactly what you were asking for so here's my answer...It says in the manual that the lug torque is 100 ft/lbs and it is always best to try to follow any torque specs that they call for. But in all honesty as far as your lugs go, you can prolly get away with a lot less, just make sure you don't go over 100. so 85 ft/lbs will prolly work just fine, hell 75 ft/lbs would prolly be fine. The main thing is that it isn't gonna come off. But if you over torque then you risk doing a lot of damage to your lugs.
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Old 04-15-2010, 02:43 PM
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I torque to oone hundred ft/lbs +/- 5 ft/lbs using my calibrated arm ;D The real trick is to use a torque wrench the first few times then start using a breaker bar or a wrench that is appx the same length as your torque wrench was. Start using your normal wrench every time, and check your work with the torque wrench, eventually you'll have the "feel" of how tight it should be. Another trick is to take a marker and draw a line across your lug and onto your rim. after you torque your lugs down the line will be offset. maybe a quarter turn, a half a turn or whatever, but if you can remember this you don't need to always have a torque wrench to maintain proper torque. You just know that once you got it tight you need to turn it appx 1/4 turn around and it'll be just about right. These are just little tricks I've picked up at my job,theres a lot of times we have to torque a nut down to a few hundred (or sometimes a few thousand ft/lbs) and it is just physically impossible to get a torque wrench in there. so we usually do the method with the line on all the nuts we can reach and get an average distance that equals the proper torque and when we get to the ones that are harder to access we draw a line and throw a slugging wrench on it and start pounding till it all lines up. It's a major pain in the ass, and a lot of times a major pain on the hand, but it works, it always passes breakaway torque, and is a method that our quality assurance guys will pass when they do their inspections. So I'm pretty sure it'll work for you too

I know that rant wasn't exactly what you were asking for so here's my answer...It says in the manual that the lug torque is 100 ft/lbs and it is always best to try to follow any torque specs that they call for. But in all honesty as far as your lugs go, you can prolly get away with a lot less, just make sure you don't go over 100. so 85 ft/lbs will prolly work just fine, hell 75 ft/lbs would prolly be fine. The main thing is that it isn't gonna come off. But if you over torque then you risk doing a lot of damage to your lugs.
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