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Discussion Starter #1
So i was out at the drag strip in my completely stock Cobalt LT. It was easily the slowest car there averaging about 17.50 on the 1/4 mile. part of that was probably because it was my first time there, but i figure part of it is also the pathetic little 4 cyl. it has.

I have a wrote off '03 impala with a 3.8L v6 and im curious if it would be worth the effort to put it into the cobalt. i know the SS has a v6 so it should fit alright, but I'm not very familiar with all the electronic controls on the cobalt and how they interact with the engine.

anyone know what would be required to make it work? or if it's even possible
 

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Well, I wouldn't go so far as to call our little four bangers pathetic. They may not be the strongest pony in the rodeo but they have the potential to be.

Many people have found that it's far easier to build our motors for boost rather than a complete swap. ZZP sells some bolt-on kits that are fairly straightforward just to get an idea. Supporting mods and a tune would be required for both SC and TC applications.

Chevy Ecotec 2.2 or 2.4 Bolt on Supercharger Kit | ZZPerformance
Stage 2 2.2 Turbo Kit |Stage 3 2.4 Turbo Kit for Ecotec Engines

I'm sure your 3800 would fit with enough shoehorning and dollars, but I can almost guarantee it'd be a waste of time. Even the Stage I SC kit would have no issue putting that Impala to bed, so you'd be better off going FI.

Also, no V6 was ever offered in a Cobalt.
 

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First of all the SS never came with a v6 only four cylinders but with forced induction.

Is it probably possible to swap in that v6, sure, but you saying right there you're not too familiar with the electronics is a red flag right there, anyways you're better off adding boost or building the engine for boost.
 

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Yes you did, we responded the same minute though.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Wow. thanks for the quick responses.

First of all the SS never came with a v6
i swear i read somewhere that the SS was a v6. but i guess not.

I'm sure your 3800 would fit with enough shoehorning and dollars, but I can almost guarantee it'd be a waste of time
I kinda of figured getting it in there would be over my head, that's why i asked before trying anything.


Many people have found that it's far easier to build our motors for boost rather than a complete swap.
Thanks for the links and the advice. I'll definitely look into this.
 

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yeah do your research and dont skimp on parts if you build it. Im building mine now and its a lot of fun for sure, but it also cost a pretty penny
 

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Levee
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Anything is possible with enough money, time and patience. Look at the guy that has a rwd gto powered balt. The hardest part of all of it is the wiring, all of it needs replaced.
 

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That's not just built by anyone though, I believe VW made it.
 

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Yes, they did, but it's still an impressive kit. The motor in there is 3x the displacement, 3x the number of cylinders and more than 3x the hp than stock. Plus they had to put it in the back seat just to make it fit. If that could be done, then putting a V8 in a Cobalt shouldn't be that hard.
 

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thats crazy! itd be interesting to see a V8 in a cobalt lol
 

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Levee
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If this car can exist, I see no reason why anything else can't. Check it out.

VW Golf GTI W12-650 - YouTube
The W series by VW are garbage for one, and they are no bigger than the VR6 motors. Look at the displacement of the w12 and vr6, not much difference. Those w series engines didn't make a lot of power like the v12s make, just fyi. :)
 

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Here's what Wiki has to say about the GTI W12:

The car features a 6.0L W12 bi-turbo engine from the Bentley Continental GT delivering 650 PS (478 kW; 641 hp), 720 N·m (531 lb·ft) of torque, 0-100 km/h (62.1 mph) in 3.7 seconds, and a top speed of 202 mph (325 km/h). The W12 differs from the standard GTI in several ways. It is 70 mm (2.76 in) lower and 160 mm (6.30 in) wider, the rear seats have been removed to accommodate the mid-engine design, and the roof is made from carbon-fibre composite. The W12-650 achieved a time of 1:29.6 on BBC Top Gear’s Power Lap feature. Jeremy Clarkson showed that the car had trouble with high-speed cornering but was a blast in the straights.
And the Mk5 Golf R32:

In late September 2005, the Mk5 R32 went on sale in Europe. It features an updated 3.2-litre VR6 engine of that fitted to the previous Mk4 version, with an extra 10 PS (7 kW; 10 bhp) courtesy of a reworked inlet manifold. Maximum power is now 250 PS (184 kW; 247 bhp) at 6,300 rpm; torque is unchanged at 320 N·m (236 lbf·ft). It reaches an electronically-governed top speed of 250 km/h (155.3 mph). Going from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) will take 6.5 s, reduced to 6.2 s with the Direct-Shift Gearbox.
Doesn't sound anything at all similar.
 

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Not always the case. A blower might never be as efficient as a turbo, but it doesn't mean it can't compete. Take a TVS for example. A properly tuned one can more than hold it's own even when facing a well tuned turbo. Of course their potential tapers off past that point whereas a turbo can keep on pushing, but it doesn't mean buying a turbo will automatically make you faster than a supercharger.
 

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I think he was referring to the new Chevrolet SS, which is a 6.2L
 

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