Chevy Cobalt Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello. I'm and an 18-year-old who graduated in 2020 and now is in college for automotive my goal is to open up a one-stop-shop in my home town my first car is a 2005 cobalt LT with a 5-speed manual. I'm slowly modding it and having it be my learner car/daily driver. My mechanic classes got pushed back till next fall so I'm slowly teaching myself. I'm excited to be part of this community
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
If you want to be a business owner and a mechanic on top of that, get ready to have lots of patience. With the cars and customers alike. I recommend starting off by working for an individual shop. That way you’ll build you’re experience.

I’ve been at it for years and am still learning. If you can get good at suspension and master alignments, you’ll really never run out of work. That’s what I specialize in. But also I haven’t limited myself to one aspect of the car. I can pretty much work on anything except rebuild transmissions, I don’t have the patience or know how for that. Although changing one out is fairly easy.

As it seems, I have worked in the same shop for a while now. My boss is getting older and will likely pass the business on to me when the time comes. I know I can do it, but at this point it’s easier to work for someone and not have to worry about all the headaches of the business itself.

FYI, what they teach you in college is not the same as what you’ll learn over 5-10 years in the business. I thought going to school was great and all, which it was, but have learned more that was not taught when in school. I went to a 3 year college segmented into suspension/steering/brakes/alignments/driveline, engine, auto electrical, transmission. Also took some auto body which I found out that it was not for me. Auto body it quite laborious and time consuming. Wasn’t bad at it but didn’t interest me to do it as a profession.

Also being a business owner means you would do better with taking some accounting classes. Not sure if that’s offered but would be very smart to take. I did that in high school. Business and industrial math were offered in college.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
If you want to be a business owner and a mechanic on top of that, get ready to have lots of patience. With the cars and customers alike. I recommend starting off by working for an individual shop. That way you’ll build you’re experience.

I’ve been at it for years and am still learning. If you can get good at suspension and master alignments, you’ll really never run out of work. That’s what I specialize in. But also I haven’t limited myself to one aspect of the car. I can pretty much work on anything except rebuild transmissions, I don’t have the patience or know how for that. Although changing one out is fairly easy.

As it seems, I have worked in the same shop for a while now. My boss is getting older and will likely pass the business on to me when the time comes. I know I can do it, but at this point it’s easier to work for someone and not have to worry about all the headaches of the business itself.

FYI, what they teach you in college is not the same as what you’ll learn over 5-10 years in the business. I thought going to school was great and all, which it was, but have learned more that was not taught when in school. I went to a 3 year college segmented into suspension/steering/brakes/alignments/driveline, engine, auto electrical, transmission. Also took some auto body which I found out that it was not for me. Auto body it quite laborious and time consuming. Wasn’t bad at it but didn’t interest me to do it as a profession.

Also being a business owner means you would do better with taking some accounting classes. Not sure if that’s offered but would be very smart to take. I did that in high school. Business and industrial math were offered in college.
Thanks for the advice. I have been working on cars since i was little with my dad. My cobalt is my own thing so I’m trying new things with it. But yeah shops here in my town don’t like to hire people without experience but good thing I work at the local Autozone so I get to know them a little bit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
You will have to start somewhere. You will eventually find someone willing to hire and train you. Although at this point I haven’t got a lot of patience for training a green mechanic. I have tried before and have found many that are not made for working on vehicles. I also see a lot of mechanics that I can’t figure out how they have their own businesses. Really bad ones that screw things up constantly. Won’t take advice one how not to do things. As a mechanic you will always be learning and not letting new knowledge be used will make a bad mechanic. I’m still learning and my boss that’s 30 years older than me is still learning new things. It is harder to pass new knowledge on to old mechanics as they get stuck in their own way of doing things.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top