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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
For you guys and gals thinking about this school for tech training and getting a future ahead, I will be breaking down what this school is about and the flaws/pluses of having this crash course Snap-On Tools sponsored school has to offer. For those who have already been through this course, please add to what I miss on here. For those who are attending, feel free as well. For those who want to go to this school, read all of this.

I am currently attending and still have 5 more courses before my NATT (Nissan Advanced Technical Training) courses even start, so there will be much more added from those who have completed this.

What to expect from this technical training institute: They give you the information to learn mechanical and electrical skills/trades to work into the automotive industry. Whether it be hands on, class instructions, and understanding visually of what a engine/transmission/modern vehicle does today. They crash course every block of instruction to 3 weeks of each phase instead of a college giving you a full semester. Now, Manufacturers have already made correspondence courses and credentials for their specific vehicles (i.e. Ford, Nissan, Honda, etc) that are considered electives after the initial core phases.

The plus on this? You will have more credentials from the manufacturer than a 4 year degree that go towards what the manufacturers require and have a higher chance of landing a career.

The minus on this? Its generic and toss out 40% of what you learned to get into the upcoming vehicles and today's cars. They feed you information pertaining to carbuerated engines to throttle body injection (pre-1990s). In my opinion, less than 3% of vehicles you will be dealing with in the field will be 12 years or less on a vehicle, BUT the concept is great knowledge.

What about the instructors at UTi/NTi? They have 20 years+ (most instructors) experience in the field and what to expect. Their very knowledgeable and wise, but most I have ran across are v8 junkies (their not fond of fuel injected or modern mpg savers). All of my previous instructors worked at Mazda, Ford, GM, Nissan, Infiniti, Chrysler, or Subaru. They are more than happy to answer a dumb question more than anything and willing to help you understand what is going on in the ECM/PCM.

What to expect after graduation? Simple, you stand much higher than your average community college entry level technician. You carry 70% of what the manufacturers require to advance in the field already from the school. You will "not be guaranteed", trust me on this one, you will have to literally fight for a position in the field, but it will pay off really soon. Your typically looking after being hired a lube tech as an evaluation standpoint for a short period of time. Now, if your around one of UTi schools, good luck and I do mean good luck. Technicians who cannot take it anymore in the field and I know Leevecius can agree with me on this one, they will just oil up their toolbox wheels and walkout. Its a great money making field, so if you ever get to that point, talk to someone (shop foreman).

Overall, personally, its good knowledge and understanding of what goes on inside of the vehicle, but its too generic and overlooked.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Urinary Track Infection
yes, that too lol...you know what Im talking about...the fat guy who doesn't wear safety glasses in the labs and has a magical red shop towel LMAO!

This guy!!! He is so lame and watch for that red shop towel!
Oh, to add to this...That ford GT was given to the Arizona Campus from Nicholas Cage
 

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Levee
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Well you got the basics yes. Don't forhet that in that 3 week block you are in one class a day for 6 hours and if you miss tge first or last day of class you automatically fail. If you miss more than 12 hours of instruction you fail. There are 2 different class schedules, morning 6am to 1pm, and afternoon 2pm tp 9 pm, both with 1 hour lunch. If you fail 2 consecutive classes the put you on acedemic suspension for 6 months (had friends have this happen to them).

They also help you to find and keep your job while at school. There is no on campus living (at least at my campus there wasn't, and certain campuses have certain special courses (like Chicago is the only one to offer an in depth diesel course as well as only one to offer international's elective).

If you take all they have to offer before electives it will take 22 months to complete. Its not a bad school, and I recommend it, but you really need to be on your A game to do well there. If youre not swrious, you will find out very quickly.

As far as the mechanics walking out, that is common, but that is where your ase's come in handly. The more you have, the more money as well as the easier it is for you to get a better job somewhere else (and the more your current employer will beg you to stay). Most guys like me tho, when they walk out, they start their own shop.

---------- Post added at 04:28 PM ---------- Previous post was at 04:25 PM ----------

UTI is a school that will make you realize if being a mechanic or technitian is what you really want to do, and even more so, what field of that you want to be (auto, diesel, marine, motorcycle, ect).
 

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Thanks guys! Looking into UTI now. May be in a unique position for some special funding so I am going to see if I can make it happen. There is one in my state about an hour away.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys! Looking into UTI now. May be in a unique position for some special funding so I am going to see if I can make it happen. There is one in my state about an hour away.
I know they have the FAFSA, scholarships, and other fundings available. Most of the students are on direct subsidized loans as well. It is very expensive for just a little over a year program.

I would also recommend not to use colligate housing program. I am only 20 miles shy of a campus and there are a few that travel an hour away. The colligate housing dept. will set you up in an apartment with 3 other roommates sharing a 2 bedroom 2 bath. Ive visited and said "what a load of garbage and they expect $350/month to cover for this." They profit off of you as well, so be careful.

Far as the programs, its very informative of cars past and present, but not future or modern. Nissan wont cover the GTR, Leaf, Juke, or 2012-up. They do however, cover the CVT transmission that is being used on multiple manufacturers today. Ford FACT just covers their particular engines and driveability. You will see that Ford likes to rename sensors to their own.
 

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I know they have the FAFSA, scholarships, and other fundings available. Most of the students are on direct subsidized loans as well. It is very expensive for just a little over a year program.

I would also recommend not to use colligate housing program. I am only 20 miles shy of a campus and there are a few that travel an hour away. The colligate housing dept. will set you up in an apartment with 3 other roommates sharing a 2 bedroom 2 bath. Ive visited and said "what a load of garbage and they expect $350/month to cover for this." They profit off of you as well, so be careful.

ROTFLMAO! Right now I rent a single room in a 5 bedroom home with 8 other people and 2 dogs. I pay $625 a month. NO Joke! I'll take that housing program with the blink of an eye to get the hel* up outta this wack shack!

Good to know there not into many newer technologies such as Hybrids. Not really what I am currently interested in anyways. That could be because the technology is so new and they don't have Instructors with 20 years experience with them, and the new technology that dealers are creating for today and tomorrow. Which would make sense to me. If you don't know it like the back of your hand. Don't teach it. Pretty simple right?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
ROTFLMAO! Right now I rent a single room in a 5 bedroom home with 8 other people and 2 dogs. I pay $625 a month. NO Joke! I'll take that housing program with the blink of an eye to get the hel* up outta this wack shack!

Good to know there not into many newer technologies such as Hybrids. Not really what I am currently interested in anyways. That could be because the technology is so new and they don't have Instructors with 20 years experience with them, and the new technology that dealers are creating for today and tomorrow. Which would make sense to me. If you don't know it like the back of your hand. Don't teach it. Pretty simple right?
Actually, the instructors are either a master ASE tech or Senior Master Tech ASE certified. They do have knowledge of hybrid vehicles and you will be working with them (just remember the yellow wire indicates high voltage ;) ). Hybrid has been around for over 6 years now and its a requirement in their electives course you choose. Now, not all of them have been in the field recently, most have left before 2008, but their point and teachings are for mainly electrical circuits which you would normally deal with in a modern vehicle today. Just to give you a heads up, study up on simple electrical knowledge before you get enrolled, it will be at most handy :)
 

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Actually, the instructors are either a master ASE tech or Senior Master Tech ASE certified. They do have knowledge of hybrid vehicles and you will be working with them (just remember the yellow wire indicates high voltage ;) ). Hybrid has been around for over 6 years now and its a requirement in their electives course you choose. Now, not all of them have been in the field recently, most have left before 2008, but their point and teachings are for mainly electrical circuits which you would normally deal with in a modern vehicle today. Just to give you a heads up, study up on simple electrical knowledge before you get enrolled, it will be at most handy :)
Yellow= High... Got it! :thanks

I will actually do that! Thanks for the tip!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yellow= High... Got it! :thanks

I will actually do that! Thanks for the tip!
Your welcome, not anything about how electricity flows or dark matter stuff, just basic electrical understanding. They teach it to you, but it will help you understand how a modern vehicle operates today on computers. Just about everything is electric, only a few mechanical moving parts left now at days.

You also will learn about not only diagnosis, but repairs, R&R's, and how an engine today operates. Pretty simple once you get the hang of it.
 

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Levee
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I tell you what, Ryan, if you can teach yourself to read a proper wiring diagram and all the symbols, you will be fine. Learn the simple electrical definitions (volts, amps, ohms, ect) and you won't have a problem doing any of the electrical courses at UTI.

I went to UTI (as you probably read earlier), I've graduated from there as well. I think as long as you have the passion for the field and know how to KEEP the passion after starting the school, you will be fine. Like I said before, UTI is a school that will REALLY make you think twice if this is the field you want to be in. If not, you will know very quickly. Now, if it is the field you want to continue with, FINISH the school. After finishing, if you're not taken into any of the advanced courses for the sponsors of the school, that's OK. Go to ANY dealership/shop that isn't around the school (aka your home town), apply for a job and tell them you just graduated UTI. You will be hired in a heart beat, I can promise.
 

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I tell you what, Ryan, if you can teach yourself to read a proper wiring diagram and all the symbols, you will be fine. Learn the simple electrical definitions (volts, amps, ohms, ect) and you won't have a problem doing any of the electrical courses at UTI.

I went to UTI (as you probably read earlier), I've graduated from there as well. I think as long as you have the passion for the field and know how to KEEP the passion after starting the school, you will be fine. Like I said before, UTI is a school that will REALLY make you think twice if this is the field you want to be in. If not, you will know very quickly. Now, if it is the field you want to continue with, FINISH the school. After finishing, if you're not taken into any of the advanced courses for the sponsors of the school, that's OK. Go to ANY dealership/shop that isn't around the school (aka your home town), apply for a job and tell them you just graduated UTI. You will be hired in a heart beat, I can promise.
Yes I would agree more than anything with Leevecius. Stay away from the dealerships near the campuses, you will be having to prove why your better than your fellow students. The further your away, your pretty much guaranteed a starting path to this career. You will start off as a lube tech, then move onto small light weight stuff, then after time, doing all the electrical/mechanical as a Tech A or Shop Foreman before you know it.

You will also learn that technicians who don't have patience will grease up their tool box wheels and just leave. You have to keep cool no matter what goes on. You may even have a job that asks for 1 hour job and your striving at 2 hours, don't loose your cool. Just deal with it from time to time (especially warranty work). You will have after time techniques that you pick up and can knock out most of the jobs in half the time it calls for and that's where the $$$ comes into play :)
 

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Levee
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Yes I would agree more than anything with Leevecius. Stay away from the dealerships near the campuses, you will be having to prove why your better than your fellow students. The further your away, your pretty much guaranteed a starting path to this career. You will start off as a lube tech, then move onto small light weight stuff, then after time, doing all the electrical/mechanical as a Tech A or Shop Foreman before you know it.

You will also learn that technicians who don't have patience will grease up their tool box wheels and just leave. You have to keep cool no matter what goes on. You may even have a job that asks for 1 hour job and your striving at 2 hours, don't loose your cool. Just deal with it from time to time (especially warranty work). You will have after time techniques that you pick up and can knock out most of the jobs in half the time it calls for and that's where the $$$ comes into play :)
The pay depends on the shop. If he is at a dealership, you will probably be seeing flat rate. Flat rate is where the real money is at, once you are comfortable doing jobs. Just for example purposes, brakes pays 5 hours book time. You get it done in 2. You still got paid for 5, and now you can start a new brake job. You get it done in 2 again. There you have just done 4 hours of work, but got paid for 10 hours. See where the money comes in at?

Another thing to look at is that most flat rate places have a safety hour limit. Lets say, 20 hours /wk. That means if you don't do 20 hours a week in work, you will still get paid for 20 hours regardless. There are a lot of shops that do it this way.

Now as far as being a lube tech. Take some ASE's before getting out of school. If you have just 1 ASE before getting out of UTI, you will not be a lube tech but straight into a tech slot. Obviously the more ASE's you have, the easier it is for you to get a job. So I suggest studying and getting your certs before getting out.

And about leaving, yes there are a lot of people that do that. But sometimes it's not just them leaving, but bad management. You will figure that out fast. I know a lot of guys will leave if they feel they aren't getting proper pay for the work load they get. And as a ASE certified tech (or master like me), you get a LOT of say when it comes to more pay before you start working. Just know, the closer you are to being a master tech, the more work you get. :) But 99% of the time, the more money you get too, and most businesses know this already so a lot of guys don't have this problem. Some do tho, but they never hesitate to leave because they know any other shop on the road will be biting at the bits to hire them. :)
 
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