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I got told my many of people, but learned today at NATT 3 Transmissions part, its an old F1 style transmission, called a "Manual Transmission"...Lots of people claim including the sticker for price features on the window say "Auto Trans 6 speed". It uses automatic features controlled by the ECU, it has a dual clutch feature and is controlled by driver (manual controls through the paddle shifter)...Transmission is located on the rear axle.

The ECU will calculate when the the next gear is synched on input and output shafts inside the transmission. It will basically turn the next gear on the synchro and fork before you are able to hit that paddle shifter. Interesting huh? Technology of this was based upon german engineering along with Formula 1 transmissions for over 25 years. So new technology is still old, just revised on a new car.
 

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Are you getting super excited about leaving Nissan behind and learning about some descent cars :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Are you getting super excited about leaving Nissan behind and learning about some descent cars :)
Nissan/Infinity cars are using old German Engineering for longevity of lifespan. Why leave a manufacturer that is well known to the aftermarket world?
 

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We've come a long way in terms of technology, and that's all fine and well, but I still believe that an automatic (even a fancy F1 inspired one) has no place in a sports/super car. It's roughly the equivalent of going to a strip club to do your sudoku. Shame on Nissan for not supplying one and shame on us for buying them.
 

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We've come a long way in terms of technology, and that's all fine and well, but I still believe that an automatic (even a fancy F1 inspired one) has no place in a sports/super car. It's roughly the equivalent of going to a strip club to do your sudoku. Shame on Nissan for not supplying one and shame on us for buying them.
x2. I don't buy them though so :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Shame on what? Not being able to miss a gear at all? You know GM incorporated some of Nissan's designs to improve their vehicles (aka Corvette '14 stingray's Rev match system). That right there is to prevent from your gear rings from chipping teeth and equally matching the next gear to move the synchronizer sleeve over. This was originally for the 370z and G37 transmission system in 6 speed manual.

For as the GTR goes, when your going to supercar, you do not want to break a very expensive transmission, that's why Nissan chose that system. It is considered "manual", just that the TCM is monitoring the transmission for you. You can call it an automatic, then be shamed upon and laughed at by Nissan gurus and technicians.
 

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If it doesn't have a clutch pedal or a proper shifter, it's not a manual. Just like after three strikes, you're out, and no army of Nissan technicians or lawyers can dispute that.

As for driving aids like a rev match system or TCM monitoring, that's great. If you're out getting groceries, or driving the kids to soccer practice. Sports cars and supercars on the other hand are not supposed to be comfortable, or easy to drive. They are supposed to challenge the driver, both mentally and physically, and it's overcoming and mastering those challenges that is so rewarding to the driver. Flapping a paddle on the steering column doesn't make you a good driver, heel-and-toe downshifting coming into a corner in a RWD car with no driving aids and keeping it together, that is something, and even if it's not as quick as the fancy automatic, you're twice the man for doing it. Can I get an amen?
 

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Amen. Except for the physically challenging part. I would still like a comfy sport car

2005 cobalt base model coupe
 

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Amen brotha!!!!!


When Nissan builds a good car, something that isn't over priced or impossible to work on while still being reasonably quick then maybe we can have a better conversation

I'd kill myself before I ever decided to work for nissan
 

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I'd rather have a fake manual if its good than a true manual. I used to think opposite but not having to take both hands off the wheel while hammering twisties is a lot better than fighting a clutch and stick. Took my miata to the mountains a couple days ago, I did not go all out but man, though fun the whole time I was saying to my g/f "I wish this was paddle shift." Not some stupid paddle shift system though, a proper one that handles the duties better than shifting your own on a perfect day when all the planets align. I enjoyed the roads but these were very challenging roads with turns that could make some people freak and "give up." You needed 100% concentration.
 

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I don't argue that modern, racing inspired automatics are 'better' than manuals, because they are. They go about doing their work much quicker and more efficiently (and safer) than your hands and feet ever could. Manuals on the other hand are antiquated, relics from the past. I get that, I really do. Call me a purist, but I believe certain things in life are not supposed to be easy. If they were, then there would be no sense of accomplishment. You do not go out and buy a sports car to be comfortable in, or because it's relaxing to drive, it's not meant for that. As an enthusiast, the kind of challenge that it brings is a necessity, otherwise you'd just wasting your time and your money. Jeremy Clarkson from Top Gear said it best, he said (paraphrasing) ''If you want to go fast, get a flappy paddle. If you want to have fun, get a manual.''
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Amen brotha!!!!!


When Nissan builds a good car, something that isn't over priced or impossible to work on while still being reasonably quick then maybe we can have a better conversation

I'd kill myself before I ever decided to work for nissan
Nissan has built quite a few good cars, 280Z, GTR Skylines, Silvia's, Primeras, stuff that the US market will not sell :(

Ever heard of an aftermarket company that took the JUKE and put the VQ38DETT full setup in it and called it the JUKE-R? That is one bad mofo grocery getter :p
 

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Plain Jane I agree with your take completely. But whether we like it or not paddle shift transmissions are the future, it's just the way things are advancing in the industry. Unfortunate for purists, yes. A little bit wrong? Yeah I think so, personally. But I think we can all admit they do have their advantages. Here's how I see it:

If I want a track day car to attack time trials and get a quickest lap, I'll go with a twin clutch paddle shift transmission. If I want a car for a fun thrilling weekend afternoon drive, I'll take a traditional standard w/clutch any day.
 

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I love manuals don't get me wrong, normal driving and some fun on good roads they are a blast and those burbles and pops with a nice exhaust setup on deceleration are music to the ears but doing the driving I was doing where you had to be inch perfect or you were over the line and possibly going to cream a car, truck, 18 wheeler or coal truck coming around the "how are these possible bends" or into a wall of rocks or not getting your downshift right and upsetting the rear and thus kicking yourself off the mountain to a not so good outcome I'll take a nice paddle shift system, rev matching downshifts all day.

Basically if you love manuals and killing your aging legs, get a stick and keep it. I have mine and maybe another down the road. That way when the day comes where no manuals are found on new cars you can still have your fun.
 

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We are each entitled to our views, some of us are purists, and others are not. I know where I stand, but that doesn't make me blind to the fact that yes, the modern automatic is a far more effective and efficient tool than the antiquated manual. By taking away the clutch and center column shifter, you're eliminating a good deal of work for the driver so he or she can better concentrate on their art (assuming we're talking about racing) It will shift in fractions of a second, both up and down, and perfectly, every time. As for manuals, it's up to us to do the shifting, and none of us are anywhere near perfect. Although I personally would hesitate to choose a dual clutch auto on a race track as opposed to it's manual twin, I still know which will be faster. The automatic.

But the fact is, we don't drive on racetracks, nor do we cut through them on our commute to work/school, our roads are not for racing, so those attributes aren't as relevant. In this case, the goal is not to go fast, but the emphasis (for the enthusiast anyways) would be the fun factor, and that's why the manual still exists today. Going through the gears, downshifting, holding the clutch in traffic, that makes the drive a more involving experience than resting your left foot on the dead pedal the whole time. That's why I drive a manual. Not because I can do the Nürburgring in 8 minutes, it's because I can do it in 10 and have a blast doing it!
 
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