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I'm new to the forum and I just bought a 07 LS Cobalt w/ 5seed. It is still under warranty and the engine light (steady) came on. The dealer ran a check and said that it is the clutch switch and is replacing the part. Has anyone else experienced this kind of sensitivity from the sensor in the clutch pedal.
 

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I'm not that great on the clutch myself, but I have had the car for only 2 wks. Do you think after they fix it and I watch my foot it will be ok? I am in the decision process on whether I will get an extended warranty on it. I didn't feel a need to do this until now; since I don't really know its history. This is my first car and I really like it.
 

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take it back to the dealer and make em fix that. i think the warenty is a waste of money. i had it for my 1st cobalt and when something went wrong they always try n find a loop hole so they dont have to fix it. i cancceled it and got my money back. i had the best 1 2!!!
 

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thanks for the quick responce. I will post how it goes; and I will pick my foot up off the clutch!
 

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I'm not that great on the clutch myself, but I have had the car for only 2 wks. Do you think after they fix it and I watch my foot it will be ok? I am in the decision process on whether I will get an extended warranty on it. I didn't feel a need to do this until now; since I don't really know its history. This is my first car and I really like it.
I don't think extended warranties are a good deal. They have a lot of shortcomings. First, they are ridiculously expensive and I've read articles in professional magazines like, "Money", that agree and if you took the money you would have spent for an extended warranty and just put it in an interest bearing account instead, you'll be ahead of the game financially.

Secondly, when they try to sell you these extended warranties, they leave you with the impression that everything that could possibly go wrong on the car is covered, "Bumper-to-Bumper". This is an all out lie. :shock: The parts that fail due to normal wear and tear are not covered under these extended warranties. This includes, tires, brakes, spark plugs, spark plug wires, belts, hoses, filters, windshield wipers, etc. What these warranties will cover are catastrophic failures in the drive-train, i.e. engine and transmission and anything else on the car that might actually break. But I ask you, how many times does this happen? Not often and if it did on a particular kind of car, then you shouldn't be purchasing that car in the first place, as it's a pile of junk. :shock:

Third, with an extended warranty it is in the vested interest of the company that sold it to you, (when and if your vehicle ever does break down), to have it repaired as cheaply as possible, using rebuilt, instead of new parts, etc. Do you really want your car repaired like that?

Lastly, many of these extended warranty companies go out of business and leave you holding a very expensive piece of paper that is now worth nothing. An extended warranty isn't usually through the vehicle manufacturer, but an outside company. :shock:

You'll get big pressure from so-called, "salespeople", (they are actually SHARKS!), to buy the extended warranty, but that isn't because they give a flying rats ass about you, (a real salesperson WOULD!), but because they want that nice commission check they get when you buy that extended warranty. :shock:

Long and short of it all, if the car needs an extended warranty, then it's one to steer clear of.

Be careful. Consumer beware.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the info on the ext. warr. my feelings also. I am still worried about this engine light going off and what this 'clutch release switch' is all about. I did some research

Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL), Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) P0833 - Team ZR-1 Corvette Racers

according to this and the document given to me by the mechanic at the dealership they suggest to adjust the clutch pedal position sensor as opposed to replacing it. My mechanic said he is going to replace it. I assume he used a DVOM to check the clutch, but it goes on to say this code can set if the driver rests their foot on the clutch preventing the pedal from reaching the top switch....this would be me!

I guess my questions are...do they need to replace this? and if they do, am I going to have other problems? Or would it be just wise to replace it and reduce the sensitivity by adjusting it so the pedal must travel farther before engaging the switch?
 

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What you describe, with your foot on the clutch pedal tripping the check engine light, is possible. Instead of tossing money at the vehicle first, try getting the check engine light trouble codes cleared to re-set the light. This way, if you keep your foot off of the clutch, that light might not ever come back on. Another thing to consider is, with resting your foot on the clutch pedal, it is likely that the clutch itself might very well wear out before its time and that's not an inexpensive repair, let me tell you!
Is this problem covered under the warranty for the car?
 

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The current bumper to bumper warranty is covering it. I have 500 miles left on this warranty. Then the power-train warranty is for 100,000 miles. I do alot of freeway miles and will run this warranty out fast.
 

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The current bumper to bumper warranty is covering it. I have 500 miles left on this warranty. Then the power-train warranty is for 100,000 miles. I do alot of freeway miles and will run this warranty out fast.
Okay, then I'd recommend doing a thorough preventative maintenance check on all fluids in the car, including engine oil, transmission fluid, power steering fluid, antifreeze and brake fluid. You want to see if any of these fluids are in particularly bad shape, because if they are, the components they are supposed to be protecting may fail at an earlier expected mileage than they should, which you want to try and avoid of course. With a clean paper towel in your hand, pull the engine oil dipstick out and let a drop of the oil drip onto the paper towel. What you want to look closely for is not necessarily the color of the oil, but for any dirt particles present in the oil or metal shiny metal particles, (severe engine wear). Do the same for the transmission fluid and power steering fluid. Transmission fluid that is in good shape will be a rosy, red, pinkish color. Make sure to smell the transmission fluid itself and make certain it doesn't smell burned, which sort of smells like burned coffee. With the engine COLD, open the coolant overflow tank and stick a strong light into the opening. What you are looking for is accumulated dirt, or sludge build up. It's not uncommon for the cooling systems of GM cars, (which are equipped with Dexcool antifreeze), to become very sludged up, almost looking like it is jammed with mud, because someone used a non-Dexcool approved antifreeze to top off the Dexcool with, OR just using TAP WATER, which is not a good thing. Distilled water should only be used to mix with Dexcool, or the sludge issue can arise. Also have the antifreeze freeze point checked with a hydrometer. It should be at about -35 deg. F. or so, if the mixture of water to coolant is correct. If it's less than that, it's a weak mixture and needs to be changed, especially with winter coming at us very shortly. You can check brake fluid by removing the brake master cylinder cover and immersing a clean paper towel, rolled up so that it is pointed, rather like a pencil, into the fluid. Push it all the way to the bottom of the reservoir and move it around a bit, then remove the paper towel and look at the tip of it. Brake fluid in good shape should appear clear to a light golden color. MAKE SURE NOT TO LET ANY BRAKE FLUID DRIP ONTO YOUR CARS PAINT, OR IT WILL DESTROY THE PAINT! If it is brown, or has particles in it, that's not a good sign and the brake fluid should be flushed out if for noting more than safety reasons. You can do this same test with the power steering fluid, with again looking for dirt, particles in it, or a discoloration to brown, (new brake fluid is clear). You can also have the boiling point of the brake fluid tested with a product called, "Strip Dip", which is a small strip of specially chemically treated paper that is immersed into the brake fluid and what color it turns to, or not, will tell you how much water is present in the brake fluid. Too much water in the brake fluid can be dangerous, as this lowers the boiling point of the brake fluid, which can lead to the brake pedal dropping to the floor, not stopping your car and just generally ruining your day. :(

With that many miles on the car, I'd also remove a spark plug to inspect it. GM cars come with platinum spark plugs, which are supposed to be good for 100,000 miles, (in reality, that's usually about 70,000 miles or a little less, in my opinion), so with almost 100,000 miles on the car, it may very well have its original spark plugs, on their last legs. Another problem that can show up is that with leaving spark plugs in the engine for almost 100,000 miles, they sometimes can seize to the threads they are threaded into, making removing them a real problem. Sometimes the threads in the head can be stripped out by removing spark plugs that have been left in too long and need what's called a heli-coil repair. The 100,000 mile mark is a major service interval for many vehicles so check things over with a fine tooth comb to see what preventative maintenance has been completed already, or not. Have the suspension checked out too, i.e. tie rod ends and MacPherson struts. The car is at the mileage where any of this may need attention.

Also, check the fuel filter. This is vitally important. Today's engines are all fuel injected with electric fuel pumps inside the gas tank, with the fuel filter being between the fuel pump and the engine. As that fuel filter becomes older and plugged up with dirt, (as it is supposed to do), it makes it harder and harder for the electric fuel pump to pump fuel through that increasingly restrictive fuel filter. The end result is the fuel pump saying, "Okay, I give up", and it burns out. The repair bill for replacing a fuel pump is usually about $400 - $500. The replacement cost of a fuel filter? Usually about $20 for a good fuel filter and about $20 - $30 for labor, so about $50. $450 or $50, take your pick.

The brake pads at all four wheel positions should be looked at to make sure there is some decent brake pad life left and the brake rotors aren't rusted to pieces, or have blue hot spots in the surface of the rotors.

Look closely at the serpentine belt to see if it is dry rotted, cracked, or glazed, on EITHER side, i.e. the grooved side or the smooth side. Check the air filter and see if it looks newer or old and plugged up. At this mileage, it might be prudent to also have an electrical system test done, which will check the battery, alternator, (recharges the battery), and starter. Original equipment batteries are usually on their last legs going into their fifth year of age.

Sounds like you may already have, but also have the onboard computer checked for any stored trouble codes that might tip you off about a lingering problem. Advance Auto Parts or Auto Zone can do this for you for free, as well as the electrical system test for free. They may even have the Strip Dip brake fluid test strips. If not, better auto parts stores like NAPA, or Carquest usually have them. Call around.

Another very commonly neglected filter is the cabin air filter, which filters out dust, dirt and with some of them, even pollen and other nasty stuff. It's usually located behind the glove box or in the cowl area, below the windshield.A lot of folks mistakenly think this isn't an important filter, but it sure is! A plugged up cabin air filter puts additional stress and strain on the vehicles air conditioning system and you don't want to pay for expensive air conditioning components.

You want to get this done as quickly as possible so if there are any issues that need taking care of you can take it back to the dealer with the list and say, "Hey, wait a minute. There's some items on this car that need attention". Most states require even used car dealers to have a 30 day warranty on the vehicles they sell, so get cracking on this to protect yourself. Professional auto centers can perform this preventative maintenance check and provide you a typed up report as to what needs attention and how much it will cost. This is the kind of documentation you'll need to present to the dealership where you bought you vehicle, in order for them to perform the work under any kind of warranty anyway. :) Couldn't hurt to do a CarFax on this car either, to make sure of any potentially serious issues the car may have had in the past. Also, GM service departments have their own computer network and you can ask for a print out of any service performed on the car, which will show anywhere in the nation it was done.

There's a lot here, so I'd recommend printing this out and making your own list of all the items I mentioned above that should be checked in order to have a reliable and sound running car. Document anything that the car needs, with the DATE, MILEAGE and VEHICLE DESCRIPTION, (an auto center will provide this to you with the receipt), BEFORE the remaining 500 miles passes by, or you'll not have a leg to stand on. Protect yourself. Get on this right away, I can't emphasize this enough. Wait till after that 500 miles has gone by and the dealership might give you a hard time. Don't wait.

Okay, my fingers are tired now. lol I hope this has been of help. Protect yourself with the steps I have outlined above when you buy any used car.

Good luck with it. Keep us posted. :)
 
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