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I have a 2010 Cobalt LS sedan.

I take great care of my car, getting the oil changed regularly, checking the fluids, washing weekly, using protectant on the weatherstripping, inside is immaculate, and I drive it almost in what most would consider a "granny" fashion. I take bumps and railroad tracks at very low speed, and 98% of the time I’m driving on the highway. I even bought an analog tire gauge and small air compressor to keep the tires properly inflated.

Still, I know very little about the deeper mechanical nature of cars and the associated jargon, but I'm trying to learn.

All that being said, here are the issues that are creeping up.

1) The ride was never perfect, even on the first day, but within the past month I am "feeling the road" a lot more. Even new asphalt roads send heavy vibration up through the accelerator pedal and floorboard. It's driving me crazy! What could be causing this?

2) My A/C has never blown particularly hard, nor is it very cold. My mother's 12 year old Blazer has better A/C than my Cobalt, in fact. At any other setting other than high, there is a buzzing sound on the right side of the car, which I can hear even with the stereo at moderate volume. Also, when on high, the A/C randomly switches to the floor vents. It sometimes switches back to the front vents within a few seconds, but other times I have to manually turn the knob off and back on to get it to work properly again. Any ideas?

3) When accelerating, it doesn’t feel like a constant, smooth upward curve; rather, it’s starting to feel slightly “jerky”. Someone told me this may indicate a problem with the timing belt?

I’ve scheduled an appointment with the dealer next week and will raise these questions, but I thought I’d ask here as well.

Thanks for your time.
 

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Don't know anything about your question 1, but can give you my experience on 2 and 3.

2. My AC has never blow particularly hard either, and is just enough to take the humidity out of the air. Most of the time, it does not cool my car to the point where it is a fridge in my car. Since I am the only driver of my car, I closed off the passenger vents and that helped a little. My blower motor is also making a whining noise, particularly at speed 3 and 4. It has done it since I gotten it and really hasn't bothered me yet, I just turn the volume up a notch.I most of the time only use the AC, when it is above 85-90 degrees out, other than that the windows are down.

3. I have noticed that when my cobalt coolant temperature is below 100*F, the car jerks like mad and I get a whiplash from it. I just let her warm up till she is above 100*F and she runs smoothly after that, no jerking, chugging, nothing.

Hope that helps a bit. Cobalts, nor any other car for that matter, aren't perfect, but they are darn good little cars. Afterall, all vehicles are man-built.
 

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I'm going to take issue with you here. I bought my daughter a 2006 Cobalt in 2008 as her college car. I wanted to buy her a 2004 Honda or Toyota, but she wanted something with a cooler appearance. I bent to her will and bought the Cobalt. (My background is that from the time I was a kid my family drove Chevys. I've owned several, only after graduating college did I experiment with imports and now I'm completely sold).

This Cobalt has had an ignition recall, a electric steering recall, a windshield washer fluid warmer recall, a fuel pump module that was not actually a recall but still replaced by the dealer no charge, a master cylinder that leaked fluid into the booster and was almost impossible to track down. The cobalt is an inexpensive (could use the word cheap) domestic vehicle used as an entry point for buyers. I'd love to get rid of it before the next thing goes wrong, but I'm funding college and the only choice is to buy something older (and I don't want to face the daughter if I suggest that).

My advice to anyone who asks me about the cobalt is to buy a slightly older Honda/Toyota/Nissan. I own a Camry with 120K that never has a problem, a Honda with 195K that has almost no issues. If you change the oil and take care of the basic maintenance there are not any problems.....wish I could say the same for the Cobalt.......
 

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...after graduating college did I experiment with imports and now I'm completely sold).
I own a Camry with 120K that never has a problem, a Honda with 195K that has almost no issues. If you change the oil and take care of the basic maintenance there are not any problems
You must have lost your way. You should post in a Toyota forum about your happiness.

Others haven't been as lucky, There's the sludge fiasco where Toyota kept blaming the customers for causing the sludge when the engine had deficiencies in design. There's the wear problem on brakes. There's the runaway engine problem where the brakes wouldn't work for some odd reason--would you want your daughter in that car? There's the supposed cure for that in the sticky accelerator pedals. There's the supposed cure for runaway acceleration with the floor mats.

And beyond all that is that Toyota was misreporting since 2002 to the NHSTA as to the uncontrolled acceleration events by categorizing them as short-lived and therefore they weren't noteworthy.

And then start asking about Corollas of the last few years.

I agree with Lutz in his book that many owners overlook flaws with their foreign products just because they dont' want to admit there is a flaw in the car which they have chosen for purchase.

Furthermore, there is a long standing discussion about fixes being performed on vehicles brought to the dealer for other services in the good old days while some of those brands were earning their "perfect" ratings from consumers because the consumers never knew of the "fixes" applied to their cars.

As far as I can tell they all have flaws. Even Consumer Reports doesn't recomend the latest Civic. Amazing turnabout despite their having nonrecommended other toyota products for a short time.

All cars put their wheels on one lugnut at a time.

---------- Post added at 10:11 AM ---------- Previous post was at 10:10 AM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by soccerfan
This Cobalt has had an ignition recall, a electric steering recall, a windshield washer fluid warmer recall, a fuel pump module that was not actually a recall but still replaced by the dealer no charge, a master cylinder that leaked fluid into the booster and was almost impossible to track down.

---------- Post added at 10:12 AM ---------- Previous post was at 10:11 AM ----------

This Cobalt has had an ignition recall, a electric steering recall, a windshield washer fluid warmer recall, a fuel pump module that was not actually a recall but still replaced by the dealer no charge, a master cylinder that leaked fluid into the booster and was almost impossible to track down. .
The electric steering motors have recalls just like Corolla's steering motors have been recalled. But the Cobalt gives a much better feel of the road than our friends 2008 (I believe) Corolla. That thing has had trouble keeping it's front bumper attached. Someone must have touched it backing into a space on the street parking downtown for the stage performance at the Schuster Theater and I noticed it had popped off partially. Years later, it still pops loose at the side.

My son's driving our 2008 Cobalt. Did the steering recall. Did a key cylinder or lock recall. He had it in Columbus staying near OSU campus while he worked downtown for the summer in a government office. Never faltered.

Tremendously cold air conditioning.

---------- Post added at 10:26 AM ---------- Previous post was at 10:12 AM ----------

I'd love to get rid of it before the next thing goes wrong, but I'm funding college and the only choice is to buy something older (and I don't want to face the daughter if I suggest that).

My advice to anyone who asks me about the cobalt is to buy a slightly older Honda/Toyota/Nissan. I own a Camry with 120K that never has a problem, a Honda with 195K that has almost no issues. If you change the oil and take care of the basic maintenance there are not any problems.....wish I could say the same for the Cobalt.......
I'd add that if I were concerned about a car I owned and I loved Honda and Toyota, I'd exchange it very rapidly for a car I felt my daughter were safe in. There would be no kvetching on forums about this and that. I'm sure your daughter would love that you cared about her to get her into a car that's super dependable and never has problems.

BTW, my Buick LeSabre has 185K miles with little in the way of problems through the 14 years. My other Buick leSabre is approaching 120K miles and is great after 8 years. I maintain all with oil changes, etc., myself. I bought both NEW. The Cobalt I bought used and have been extremely happy. I covered it with a long term warranty since I couldn't be sure of the previous ownership's care for the vehicle. Very inexpensive insurance.

Good luck to your daughter in college. It's a great experience in most cases.
 

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For your A/C problem, have you checked your cabin air filter, my car was having the same problem you are having and after replacing my filter, takes minutes until my car is cool where it use to take about 15 minutes......just a thought.
 

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love my balt, would die if I had to drive a corolla, camry, civic or some other junk car. Every car has its issues, recalls and such, but hey, they are fixed at no charge so why bitch, inconvenient? Yes, but get some boards and nails and build a bridge and get the eff over it as I say.

Another thing, you bought a used car, you're bound to have issues with ANY used car if its over a certain point/mileage.

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On Topic-

A/C could be anything from dirty cabin filter to needing a recharge. The vibrations, alittle tougher to figure out. The jerky feeling could be a timing issue, bad injectors, coils or plugs that are causing a misfire.
 

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Everyone is allowed to have opinions.

On that note, I was an installer, fabricator and mechanic for 10 years full time and I still work part time as one. i have worked at 4 very notable shops and from this I have learned that every car, every manufacture has issues. A Honda is no more reliable than a Chevy which is not more reliable than a Toyota which is no more reliable than a BMW which is no more reliable than a Dodge. Every manufacture has recalls and issues, every manufacture has issues that are more prone to that manufacture and so on. I have owned over 40 cars since I was 14, i am 30 now, all different makes and models. I have has Hondas not make it to 120K and I had one that I bought with 195K and it ran like a champ. I had a celebrity with a 2.8 (which was one of the most unreliable motors chevy ever made) make it to 220K on the original motor, my grandmother bought it new and took very good care of it. Owning a car is just like poker, it is the luck of the draw, they all break, they all have issues, some just make it longer than others.
 

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To answer some of the OP's questions..

For one The AC could possibly be the in cabin air filter, I had this problem pulled the in cabin filter out and it was growing... so ya replaced that and now I could freeze to death if i turn the AC all the way up. Also it helps if you turn on the recirculate the AC is really designed to run with resurculate on it helps a bunch as well. One final note is that if its 100 outside it will get cold it just takes longer. :)

As for the road feeling, for one how many miles do you have on the car? how many miles on the tires? and are they the original tires? if they are original there is your problem those OE tires are really crappy after about 15 thousand miles or so. I bought mine used and the ride was kinda crappy like you described put new tires on it and ride is awsome now. Also if you are taking it to the dealer just have them check all the suspention components. I know a few people who had tie rods or wheel bearing problems that kinda felt it in the road while driving. Easy stuff to fix though.
 
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