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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
'07 Cobalt, FE1. The upper stud on one link was spinning. Vice grips (on the threads) wouldn't hold it enough to break the nut free. So, I cut the stud flush with the back side of the strut's flange. From the back, I can see the 'hex' cutout in the flange. The stud (and 'hex' key) spin in said cutout. But, the stud will not come out. I've tried moderate (not massive) hammering (from the backside), and wiggling/pulling with vice-grips from the front. Nada.

I don't see anything that could be capturing it.

Q1: What am I missing here?

Q2: Do I need to get a new strut, anyway? Is the 'hex' key in the link (usually) what's rounded off, or is the hole in the strut flange undone?
 

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All I can think of is you may have made a burr when you cut the stud. Don't be shy, it's no good now so give it all you got. Maybe use a punch. I usually just grab the link and give it a good yank, if the shoulder ball pulls out then punch the stud with a punch.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I usually just grab the link and give it a good yank ...
Just to be clear, I'm trying to take it out the other way: I cut the ball end off, and left the nut. It made sense to me at the time - it was much easier to make the cut there. Now, I'm wondering if maybe the 'hex' key is tapered or something, and only way to remove the stud is by somehow first getting the nut off.
 

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That's odd. I would've thought it'd just punch out aswell. I normally burn the head off with my torch.
 

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It shouldn't be stuck, as that is just a mounting hole in the strut. The end link has the threads and a separate nut. When I took my stockers off, I had the vice grips on "tight as can be before breaking" in order to remove the nut.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
[OP]
I don't see anything that could be capturing it
.

I was just WRONG. What I thought was cut flush with the back of the flange actually left a thin layer of the 'collar' that seats against the flange. So, the stud was still captured. I finally got the nut to move (heat - propane, even), but I'd buggered the end of the threads, so I had to cut the stud again, this time on the nut's side.

The bottom one was worse, but at least I knew what I needed to do.
 

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Oh, I think I know the part you're speaking off - yeah, it sits real flush.
 

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I had to cut mine off, they are round on the ball side, I had the vice grips on as hard as I could. The aftermarket links are much better than the factory links... they even have grease fittings.
 

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I had to cut mine off, they are round on the ball side, I had the vice grips on as hard as I could. The aftermarket links are much better than the factory links... they even have grease fittings.
Absolutely. If you got the Moog ones, they're also thicker/stiffer. The Zerk fittings are a fantastic addition.
 

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I just installed new end links on my Cobalt. Man, the old ones were a bastard to get off. The Moog ones are definitely a lot better quality. I got the ones with the Part Number: K750012 and I noticed they were about an inch shorter than the stock ones. I still installed them and my car handles a lot better and the knocking and clunking noises are gone. So, I shouldn't have any long term issues running shorter end links?
 
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