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Don’t. That’s how. Just drain, change the filter, and refill. It’s a 50/50 chance the transmission reacts badly to a flush. A real flush actually takes a machine to do it and a bit more total fluid than the transmission holds.

Why are you asking anyways? Is this to try and remedy a slipping or hard shifting problem? Or just trying to catch up on maintenance? Changed mine at about 130k miles. Really no issues, just was doing it going through all of the fluids on the car. I’ll probably do it again in 40k-60k miles, I’ll inspect the fluid first.

Doing the fluid and filter change requires lifting the car off the ground. But refilling it requires the car to be pretty much as level as possible. I used the lift in my shop, although it can be done fairly easily in a garage or driveway with jack stands.

I made a thread about this subject so have a look. What I did was install a new pan and gasket. Also used genuine AC Delco Dexron VI (6) fluid sourced from a local company called Arnold Oil Company for much cheaper than can be bought in an auto parts store or dealership. Filter and gasket kit was bought at Autozone for much cheaper than I could find anywhere else, it’s a Raybestos product.

Here’s the link:
 

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Absolutely agreed - flushing a trans is just asking for trouble.
 

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I really have only ever seen the bad things happen after a flush when the transmission was probably going to take a dump pretty soon anyways. Never when one was running perfectly fine and the customer was just doing a routine maintenance. But most of the flushes were done on fairly new cars at kind of low mileage.

I don’t currently rent or own a flush machine. And really a drain and refill is what’s going to be easiest and do-able by someone that doesn’t have access to equipment.

You also left out how many miles the car has currently. Like I said, I did my transmission service at about 130,000 miles. The fluid was still pretty good looking. But it was original to the car. And there’s no chance I’d want to keep driving the car long distances with old fluid. Some weekends I’ll drive several hundred miles if I go out of town to hang out or go shopping. So I like to have a reliable car.

If you’ve already go the transmission fluid on your mind, you may want to replace other things like the belt, coolant, hoses, brake fluid, and check around the car for worn out parts like the suspension. If you haven’t done it already, I can bet the shocks and struts are blown or very weak. I was able to reuse the strut mounts on my car as the bearings and rubber bushing were still in great shape. Usually cars this old probably would have the bushings be dry rotted.

Several other things to do are an induction cleaning. I used a cleaner that gets sprayed into the throttle body. Made by Seafoam. Also new spark plugs were done afterwards, it ended up ruining them. Although they were crappy Autolite plugs that were pretty worn out. Replaced them with NGK G-power plugs. That at least made a difference in fuel mileage. Going from 17 to about 25 average mpg. If you look at the throttle body it’s probably covered in oily residue from the PCV system.
 
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