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No, the clutch MC is seperate from the brake MC. It is much smaller and should be mounted off to the side of the brake MC. Check the fluid level and fill if necessary. My '08 FSM says to bleed the system using a MityVac tool and an adapter. I don't know how to do that. Lacking that tool I would crack open the fluid line at the clutch on the bell housing and bleed it just as we bleed brakes. Check for any leaks or broken lines first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yup no leaks. Took the clutch mc out an bench tested it, seemed fine but once back in i cannot build up pressure to make the clutch work even bleeding it like you said above. Have a new mc on order for today gonna see if that works, if not i guess check the throw out bearing, ive heard its usually one or the other
 

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It is much easier to service the MC so I hope that is the issue. When you bled it was fluid being forced out? Once you bled it was there a hard pedal?
 

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the clutch needs to have a vacuum pulled on the brake master res to bleed.
any hand vacuum pump will work, just need to attach it to something that will cover and seal on fill hole if you don't have the correct screw on attachment for the res. a junkyard cap with a fitting drilled and glued into will work, maybe even a flat piece of rubber with fitting that sits on res hole. they sell the right cap but can easily be made. anyway, pull a vacuum remove vacuum, pump clutch pedal, repeat. no way to bleed it by the slave even tho there is what looks like a bleeder, just won't work that way. have to pull vacuum. oh and don't forget to pump brake pedal afterwards, the pistons can be pulled in by vacuum.
 

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For the life of me I could not understand how to vacuum bleed a hydraulic clutch. Well, now I know. This video is a perfect explanation. Just skip to 3:25 and watch. I guess it works by causing a low pressure point and the air rushes to fill that vacuum. Then the fluid fills in where the air was. Pretty slick.
 
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