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Yeah, winter gas has more butane so mileage drops. This is not the only factor though.

---------- Post added at 11:32 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:41 PM ----------

1. Time for engine and transmission to warm up to optimal temperature.
2. Transmission will not go into lock-up before it is warm therefore RPM's are 10% higher therefore burning more gas.
3. Differential lube (SAE 80)viscosity deminishes therefore harder to move.
4. Grease in wheel bearings gets really thick plus all bearings.
Front differential has 2. Two CV joints and two tripod joints all filled with grease.
5. Cold usally is accompanied by snow and snow is harder to roll through than bare pavement especially with hard to flex rubber sidewalls of tires.
Cold also causes ice build-up which weighs down your vehicle, it's like carrying extra passengers.
6. Heated seats, rear window defogger, heater fan wide open, wipers on more often, nights are longer therefore lights are on; all these draw current from alternator which drains power from engine which mean less fuel efficient.
7.Unless nitrogen filled ,watch your tire pressure because 35 psi at +30°C is only 29 psi at -30°C. You lose about one psi to every 10°C. So if you got your tires installed in a warm Cozy garage at let's say +20°C and inflated at 32 psi by the time you get home your tires are at 29 psi if it is -10°C.
8. You get screwed at the pump. Gasoline is kept at 15°C in the reservoirs. Every 15-degree swing in temperature changes the volume of gasoline by an estimated 1 percent. So if it is -5°C outside and you pump 50 liters (12 gallons) you end up with 49.3 liters (11.8 gallons) when this gas reaches external temperature.

9. This is a quote "With the weather beginning to cool in the United States and Canada, the formulation of gasoline is also beginning to change. Regulations require gasoline with lower emissions and pollution in hotter months (summer gasoline), but those rules don't apply during the winter in many areas, so refiners move back to a type of gasoline that is cheaper to produce.

September 15 was the day that gasoline requirements were eased in many areas (aka the date of the first increase in RVP [Reid Vapor Pressure])- however- since the change to cheaper winter gas is not mandated, stations don't need to sell out of fuel before purchasing winter gasoline. Basically, since there is no requirement, stations don't purchase winter gasoline until they run low, so depending on a stations volume, you may not be pumping winter gasoline just yet. This is especially true premium gasoline- stations likely still have summer blended premium on hand and thus you may notice if you use premium that your fuel economy hasn't yet taken a hit.

Others may have already noticed a small drop in fuel economy. Winter gasoline contains more butane, which costs less, but also evaporates at a quicker rate and is more volatile. The savings that refiners see are passed on to motorists, similar to when motorists see prices rise as refiners produce summer gas each spring. Since the weather grows cooler, the increase in volatility is permissible."
 

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I dont know about you all, but my mpg gets better during the winter on all my cars. Cold air is easer to burn. Cars also get better hp and tqe durring the colder months.
 

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I dont know about you all, but my mpg gets better during the winter on all my cars. Cold air is easer to burn. Cars also get better hp and tqe durring the colder months.
It's easier to ignite because of the higher amount of 02 (oxygen) in the air when it's colder, but that doesn't mean it's easier to burn anything cold. I'm not sure about the engine part, but in chemistry something with more energy (heat) is easier to burn. For example, it takes less energy to boil room temp water than to start off with ice. You need to add more energy to get something cold to burn.

2005 cobalt base model coupe
 

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I dont know about you all, but my mpg gets better during the winter on all my cars. Cold air is easer to burn. Cars also get better hp and tqe durring the colder months.
You are an exception my friend, because it doesn't logically make sense.

 

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He may live somewhere like me in Louisiana where it doesn't get as cold (anymore) as it does in Mount Snowball Maine. Yet we still get the winter gas with more aromatics for better vaporization. Not saying my mileage is better in the winter bc I really don't keep that close a watch. When it's in the 40s, that's so cold to me I sometimes think my sex has changed when I can't find the junk. :)
 

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It would be an innie here at -30. lol
 

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I just don't get it. During the hotter months I'll get anywhere between 28-29 mpg and during the colder months I get 30-31 mpg and I drive the same everyday. Cruse control to and from work. No traffic.
 

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I just don't get it. During the hotter months I'll get anywhere between 28-29 mpg and during the colder months I get 30-31 mpg and I drive the same everyday. Cruse control to and from work. No traffic.
Yeah that makes no sense. If that's the case there is some other factor involved

2005 cobalt base model coupe
 

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Yes he drives downhill all winter and uphill all summer.
 

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Yup, I've gone from over 500km to a tank to barely reaching 400 because its cold outside
 

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My daughter drove to Sherbrooke at -20°C(-4°F) and she averaged 9.6l/100Kms, she came back at -3°C (27°F)and averaged 7.6l/100Kms. Same car, same driver,same road ......different temperature.
 

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Jesus. That's quite the difference. I know my escape has gone from 560km a tank to 390km. Hurts my feelings but I haven't gotten stuck yet
 

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Yeah, but she might have drove a bit faster on the way up because the roads were nicer. She had snow and freezing rain all the way back so she probably drove a lot slower. This would factor into the equation.
 

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I went from about 33mpg, to about 30mpg when my flex pipe broke, to about 28mpg after the last time I filled up. Here in Texas, it hasn't gotten much under 40 degrees for long periods of time, but it did freeze for a few days.
 
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